Blog Post, Blog Posts

Pesticides effect on the bee population| another bee blog

I have already spoke about how bees are important to both our ecosystem and economic well being in the past, as well as the decline of the bee populations and how this is becoming more apparent to the public in the recent years.

But instead of talking about why we need bees and that they are declining. This time I would like to address a simple question; why?

and the answer is, drum roll please.

pesticides.

bumblebee_1
Image Source: bbc

 

Neonicotinoids insecticides is a relatively new pesticide regularly and widely used throughout the farming community and is highly toxic to the honey bee and other pollinators.

Penelope Whitehorn wrote a very interesting article on this and it shows that colonies of honey bees treated with neonicotinoids have a reduced rate of queens produced, up to 85%! which is a crazy.

Honey bees located close to agricultural fields usually forage crops daily for pollen that have been treated with pesticides which can heighten the risk of death and often leading to their mortality. which is a god dam shame if you ask me.

Colony Collapse Disorder is a syndrome that is effecting the honey bee populations a disease in which the worker bees and drones are disappearing from their hives leaving their queen behind and ultimately leading to the demise of that particular colony. This is a major threat to the survival of hives and its down to you guessed it neonicotinoids.

worker bees are becoming ‘insane’ and forgetting how to return home. exposing bee colonies to pesticide toxins is proven to increase the likelihood of colony collapse disorder and has the potential to be lethal to bee populations.

To round up this post here are some ways you can help the bees at home and some useful resources:

The wildlife trusts – save our bees 

Supporting tougher restrictions on bee harming pecticides 

six ways you can help the bees

 

 

 

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